Leh Lady Leh: The Girl’s Guide To Ladakh

Leh Lady Leh: The Girl’s Guide To Ladakh

A piece published on one the bestest gal pals there is, Maia Sethna’s superb blog Girl Panic:

After flying solo and moving to Delhi almost a year ago, I felt like I needed a change of scenery. I had never even set foot in Ladakh, but you don’t get much more of a dramatic scenery change than here. In fact, as soon you step of the plane at Kushok Bakula Rimpochee Airport (or Leh to you and me) there are two things you notice. One, the absence of that ‘open oven door’ sensation; the air is cool here, you can actually breathe. Two, that view. You might be mistaken for thinking you’d just touched down on the moon. It’s not named the ‘lunar landscape’ for nothing.

Once considered so remote that “only your best friend or worst enemy would visit you” there, or so the local adage goes, Ladakh is now a firm favourite on the tourist trail. With several daily flights from Delhi to Leh during season time, it has never been easier to reach: the perfect destination for a long weekend getaway out of the sweltering Delhi summer.

meg - ladakhShamless #selfie on a rare afternoon off

Upon arrival make sure to set your watches to “mountain time”. One adopts a different pace of life here: early to bed early to rise. My morning routine in Delhi generally involved dragging myself out of bed by 8.45, ready to leave the house by 9am (read 9.30). Now I am tucked up by 10, a good book my only bed partner, in order to be up at 5am before my sacred morning stroll. Yoga, shower, breakfast: check. I am generally ready to carpe the hell out of that diem by 7am.

But what to do? If you’re the kind of girl looking for poolside butler service then Ladakh is probably not your thing. But, if you’re on an odyssey for some adventure in your life then look no further: you have arrived. With more adrenaline fixes than a back-street physician’s medical bag, Ladakh is the destination for those craving a natural high. Or a literal high (it does sit at over 10,000 feet after all).

meg - ladakh 2Me and some of my new friends!

From white water rafting to off-roading; mountain biking to climbing Ladakh provides a colourful array of ways to attempt to kill oneself. Or give your parents a scare. A trekkers mecca you can cover the same rocky passes that many before have tried and failed to complete. Near death experiences avoided, you might want to thank god (or Buddha) you are still alive. And with more monasteries than you can shake a dorjey at (google it) Ladakh is the perfect place to discover your inner sanctuary.

For the believers or the just plane curious, a trip to the oracle at Saboo makes for an enlightening afternoon. No she won’t be able to tell you who you are going to marry or whether or not your boyfriend really cheated, but she might just be able to shed some light on some personal or family gripes. Or for all your homeopathic health needs, there is the Amchi at Thiksey monastery – probably the happiest man in Ladakh. Save for my co-worker Captain Sonam. You haven’t known joy until you’ve met Captain Sonam.

In short, there is no short-age of things to do in Ladakh, especially over the summer season. And if you are man, or should I say woman enough, to brave its winter season and sub-zero temperatures, then you may well be rewarded with a rare snow leopard sighting. All I know is that I have been here for over a month, have another three to go and I have not covered even half of my “To Do” list. So I am sure you Delhiites darlings can fill up a long weekend!

thiksey - 2
Room with a View: My new Home Sweet Home

 

Ladakh: The Low Down

Whilst I could write an exhaustive list of “Must Do’s” in Ladakh I will let you figure that out for yourself, but here are just a few of my favourites…

Monastery: Thiksey

Not the richest, not the oldest, but in my opinion the most beautiful (and home to the largest and most photographed statue of the Matreya Buddha in Ladakh). Wake up early for the morning prayers with the monks and several cups of butter tea if you can stomach it. Whilst you are there why not make a trip to the local herbal medicine man, the Amchi, who will tell you more about yourself than your childhood paediatrician. Every malady imaginable is prescribed with one of his foul smelling “Tibetan dirt balls” as I like to call them. Hold your nose, they taste as bad as they look.

Cycle route: Wari-La

You might want to leave it a couple of days before you exert yourself too heavily. Whether it’s your lack of physical prowess or those extra 3000 feet: the views will quite literally take your breath away. Look out for yaks, zos, marmots and a whole menagerie of wildlife not found around town.

Shop: Jigmet Couture

Whilst Ladakh is hardly a shopper’s paradise Jigmet Couture is the best place to pick up some tailor made souvenirs. The man behind the name is a real enigma. Using locally sourced textiles Jigmet offers Ladakhi fashion with a modern twist.

Place to eat: Nimmu House

Local new kid on the block with its French owner and French chef, Nimmu house provides a sophisticated alternative to momos and thukpa.

Sunset Spot: Victory Fort

Forget the crowds of Shanti Stupa, Victory Point is where those in the know go to witness the ending of another day. Watch as the afternoon shadow casts itself over the valley below like a blanket before bedtime. Romantic much?!

Drive: Towards Alchi

Traverse several different landscapes en-route to the (largest?) monastery in Ladakh. From the winding roads to open planes you will feel as though you have travelled a thousand miles in just a couple of hours. Finish up with a picnic lunch overlooking the the Alchi dam.

Book to read: “Servant of the Sahibs: A Book To Be Read Aloud” by Ghulam Rassul Galwan

This is one of those books that will stick in your mind. Francis Younghusband, friend, explorer and fellow player of The Great Game was not exaggerating when he wrote “There has never been another book remotely similar to Servant of the Sahibs”. As much a primary source as it is an adventure novel Rassul writes with such naked honesty readers (or listeners) are permitted a personal account of the caravan trails of Central Asia that no modern day historian could hope to create. An absolute must read when travelling to Ladakh!

The 33rd Kalachakra: The Greatest Buddhist Gathering, Ladakh

The 33rd Kalachakra: The Greatest Buddhist Gathering, Ladakh

Yesterday saw the first day of the 33rd annual Kalachakra in Ladakh, hosted by His Holiness the Dalai Lama. The largest annual gathering of Buddhist in the world, with over 150,000 pilgrims set to attend it promises to be quite the gathering. With a break of 38 years since the last Kalachakra was held in Ladakh it is most likely to be the His Holiness’s last in Ladakh as he is said to struggle with the altitude. Ever the professional, aside from the odd tickle in his throat, His Holiness did not show it. Sitting and reciting prayers and teachings on love and kindness he also spoke on the importance of respecting and understanding fellow human beings religions, whatever they may be.

14th-dalai-lama   His Holiness the Dalai Lama

The word Kalachakra itself means cycles of time. Generally the passage of time has a debilitating effect on human beings: as we age our sight, hearing and physical strength deteriorate. Buddhists believe that the practice of the Kalachakra helps individuals to exit this cycle and achieve enlightenment.

 IMG_3927   Solo monk

The 3rd – 6th July marks the ‘initiation’ period before the main Kalachakra begins. The primary aim of this is to learn from the Bodhisattva and Tantric vows: focusing on the path to enlightenment as well as being able to benefit all living creatures. Including several days of prayers it is a preparation stage before the period of ‘empowerment’.

Pilgrims from all corners of the world attended with real-time translations being broadcast on FM radio stations in 13 different languages. A practicing Buddhist himself, although not present on the opening day, Richard Gere will be attending in the upcoming days as one of the primary sponsors.

IMG_3926 Pilgrims arrived in bus loads from all over Ladakh, India and the world

IMG_3938 One lone pilgrim makes his way home by foot through the many ‘gullys’ that traverse the Ladakhi countryside

The crowd was something to behold with the traditional dress from around the state of Jammu and Kashmir proudly being displayed; including this Thiksey native sporting a tibi hat typical of Ladakh.

IMG_3924   A village elder (who turned out to be a great aunt of a friend of mine!) wearing her traditional attire

Whilst the left of the stage was reserved for press and foreigners, the front seats was a Red Sea of monks, all eagerly listening to His Holiness’ every word. In fact the entire Shey region was awash with the red and yellow garb of the monks.

IMG_3903   Awash with red and yellow: monks from all around the world came to attend the 33rd Kalachakra

The Kalachakra will take place until the 14th July with the Jiwetsal grounds gradually filling up with travellers and pilgrims alike. The pinnacle will be the creation of the physical representation of the Kalachakra, a mandala and meditational visual aid depicting the various stages of enlightenment. This physical mandala will then be destroyed after the end of the Kalachakra as a symbol of lack of detachment, principal to Buddhist teachings.

An English Woman Abroad: Dharamsala

An English Woman Abroad: Dharamsala

I can only going on what we ourselves did and what we have been recommend as I try to only use guidebooks as a last resort. However I’m sure you’ll find a fair few of these your dog-eared Lonely Planet.

McLeod Ganj: Headquarters of the exiled Tibetan government, bustling market town and home to the Dalai Lama.

The Church of St. John in the Wilderness: a slice of Nottingham Forest right here in Dharamasla. You will feel as though you are a pilgrim in medieval England when you stumble across this archaic little church.

Tsuglagkhang Complex: comprising a three metre high statue of Sakyamuni Buddha and a lot of ‘Free Tibet’ propaganda. The temple itself is not one of the most beautiful but the sound of so many people chanting was deeply moving and brought tears to my eyes.

Dip Tse ChokIing Gompa: funded by Richard Gere (who knew he was a practicing Buddhist) this is such a haven and much less busy than Tsuglagkhang Complex. Wander the beautiful grounds, visit the Tibetan Doll Museum and enjoy lunch and the Hummingbird Cafe (no, sadly they don’t sell cupcakes). There is also a guesthouse here which I would highly recommend anyone travelling to Dharamasla staying as it is such an oasis, however apparently it is recommended you book in advance as it almost always full.

Friendly Planet: Vikram (our hostess’s husband) raves about this place and even if we’d wanted to, I don’t think he would’ve allowed us to eat anywhere else! There is a nice mix of travellers and locals and the staff are super friendly although I would advise heading there before you’re actually hungry as the food can take a while (read: forever).

The Cricket Stadium: if your visit to Dharamasla coincides with it why not attend a cricket much. I can garuntee there will be much more crowd participation than at Lords.

Wild Camping: we did not have time to do this, but it’s top of my agenda next time I come to Dharamasala!

NGOs: if you fall in love with Dharamasla as much as I did and would like to stay for an extended period, why not volunteer at one of its several NGO’s. We visited the Jagori Rural Charitable Trust where Nasma used work. They support women in the local villages with matters concerning domestic violence, women’s and children’s health. Nasma became a little emotional upon returning and explaining the work that the women here do; it is touching to see how much time and emotion the volunteers invest in the (charity) and how deeply involved they become.