The Roseate: A Blooming Joy

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Image courtesy of Roseate Hotels & Resorts

Delhi’s NH8 doesn’t sound like an obvious location for an urban oasis, does it? But enter The Roseate’s eight-acre property and your opinion will change. Pass an austere looking guard, and the road opens up into an expansive entrance driveway, dotted with art installations and adorned with 650,000 individually cast brass leaves, by British designer John Bowmen. Let me just write that again. Six-hundred-and-fifty-thousand individually cast brass leaves. To say it’s quite an entrance would be an understatement.

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Image courtesy of Roseate Hotels & Resorts

Designed by Khun Lek Bunnag, known for his grandiose creations, the architecture throughout The Roseate sets it apart from other hotels in the city. With everything on a slightly larger than life scale, you’ll feel a little like Alice in Wonderland as you traverse its undulating grounds and water bodies. Boasting Delhi’s longest pool, at 102 metres long it is more than many can sprint, let alone swim! The Pool View rooms include private outdoor areas and direct access to the pool – perfect for a morning dip. Other notable features include a rotating pendulum disc and The Tree of Life, also designed by John Bowmen, as well as a wall of stained-glass in the lobby.

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Image courtesy of Roseate Hotels & Resorts
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Image courtesy of Roseate Hotels & Resorts

Rooms are decorated in white and grey hues, focusing on open spaces and natural light. Totally modern, all of your gadgets can be controlled from an I-pad so you can open your blinds in the morning from the comfort of your own bed. No hard hotel beds here (seemingly the mattress of choice in India) they are sink-into with soft pillows and cloud-like duvets. There is a capacious bathtub, almost al-fresco with views outside, whilst the shower doubles as a steam room and guests will find not one, but two sinks, big enough to be a church font.

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Image courtesy of Roseate Hotels & Resorts

A lot of effort has gone into the menu design. From all-day dining at Kiyan to dinners at Chi Ni, the Roseate has roped in some of Delhi’s highest-flying chefs. At the majestic Kiyan, flanked by a collonaded wall styled on the Elephanta caves, chef Nishant Choubey heads a dynamic team creating innovative fusion dishes. The menu changes every few months and as much as possible is sourced their organic farm, just a few kilometres away. I had the Organic Pomelo salad to start, which was the perfect blend of fresh and crisp with a soft sweetness from the tamarind dressing, followed by the vegetarian thali, a great introduction to North Indian cuisine for those fresh off the boat. For breakfast, there is an array of healthy and not-so-healthy dishes (I couldn’t help but opt for the trio of pancakes, not once but twice), as well as fresh pressed juices and crispy South Indian dosas. Try to make sure you have dinner at Chi Ni during your stay, for authentic Chinese flavours courtesy of chef Ban. Starting with blanched baby spinach in a sesame dressing for starter, we were taken on a culinary journey of wasabi shrimp, vegetable lettuce wrap, chicken Siu Mai, and soft and fluffy tofu bao.

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Image courtesy of Roseate Hotels & Resorts

If you’re travelling with little ones, there is an excellent kids club, with virtual simulation technology, art walls, and so much more. Honestly, you’ll have to drag them out of there. For grown-ups, the Aheli spa, headed by Sushma Rai, is the perfect hideaway. Including signature massages and hammam treatments (the only place in Delhi you’ll find them), and using Ayurvedic Kama products, you could spend more than just a few hours in their capable hands. There is also a small but perfectly formed gym and yoga pavilion.

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Image courtesy of Roseate Hotels & Resorts

Who’s it good for?

Design Junkies, Wellness Addicts, and those wanting to escape the city

For direct bookings click here.

Take the Road Less Travelled in Style: The Kohima Camp, Nagaland

Take the Road Less Travelled in Style: The Kohima Camp, Nagaland

A piece published in Delhi’s own Little Black Book, Delhi.

As a Brit, the words ‘festival’ and ‘camping’ conjure up memories of leaky tents, soggy clothing, and hangovers that just won’t budge. Whilst the concept of “glamping” has been around for a while, you will need very deep pockets to escape the mud: VIP tents at Glastonbury festival will set you back £7000+. Ever the innovators, the concept of “glamping” {glamorous camping} is enjoying a real moment in India right now. With many adventurists wanting to explore its roads less travelled; temporary, luxury accommodation is the perfect option for locations not frequented all year round.

Whilst India might not be able to compete in the way of music festivals, it has more religious and cultural celebrations that you can shake a sacred stick at, with many modern day pilgrims and travellers wanting to attend.

Presenting The Ultimate Travelling Camp; bringing you five star accommodation in seasonal or date specific locations. The first camp of its kind in India, it is a truly nomadic experience. Having only last month wrapped up their second season in Ladakh, where they were stationed for the Kalachakra festival, in honour of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, as I write this, TUTC is busy traversing the country’s most winding passes and remote hill stations, making its way to Nagaland in time for The Hornbill Festival.

At this annual festival, the sixteen tribes that make up the state come together to showcase their traditions, tribal fashion, culinary delights and musical talents. Despite their fearsome reputation of being the Land of the headhunters, for ten days, the Nagas put their differences aside for a jam-packed program of events. Running from the 1st to the 10th of December, with Mr. Modi inaugurating the event, there seriously is no better place to experience the festivities than from TUTC’s Kohima Camp, Nagaland.

Kohima Camp TentThe definition of ‘glamping’: a khaki luxury tent at The Kohima Camp

Forget sleeping bags, we’re talking four poster beds with memory foam mattresses. On returning from a day of exploring the Hornbill Festival, warm your feet by the roaring camp fire, and slip out of those well-worn hiking boots into a pair of fluffy hotel slippers. Maggi noodles and toasted marshmallows? Try freshly baked focaccia bread, to accompany your piping hot lobster bisque. The Kohima Camp, Nagaland has taken care of everything, and if there really is anything else you require, then your own personal butler {who you will literally want to take home with you when you leave} will take care of the rest.

This is camping like you have never experienced it before!

Notes in our Little Black Book | Four poster beds, luxury tents, a delectable menu, here’s presenting the ultimate traveling camp, bringing you five star accommodation in seasonal or date specific locations. Next up, the Hornbill Festival in Nagaland.

Where: Kohima Camp, Nagaland, Tekweuju, Above Japfu Christian College, Kigwema, Kohima, Nagaland

Kohima Camp is running a special limited edition for eleven days only, from 30th Nov to 10th December for The Hornbill Festival. Find out more at here.